Conference program – FLANC 2016

Berkeley City College – October 29, 2016

9-9:50

 

9-9:50 | Teaching Beginning Language Online: Questions and Possibilities – (Room 212)
by Carol Copenhagen
Abstract: 
Fact of life or wishful thinking? Can students learn a beginning foreign language online? Are there innovations that we can use to teach conversational competence? Please bring your concerns, experience and ideas and join the discussion.
Level of Education: Community College, perhaps high school or other higher education
Main Language of Presentation: English ─ Examples in Spanish

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9-9:50 | Teaching Writing through Translation and Teaching Translation through Writing – (Room 33)
by Frances Sweeney
Abstract: This presentation explores the popular topic of translation, and how it can be used to help students get excited about translating and writing.  First, we will have a brief overview of the field of translation and its theories, and then consider how they relate to main practices in writing development. The majority of time is spent on interactive practice and exercises that can be used and modified by teachers to help their students understand translation, and improve their writing at the same time. A side benefit is exploring cultural variations in language use, across genres such as songs, commercials, poetry, and essays.
Level of Education: Secondary and post-secondary
Main Language of Presentation: English ─ Examples in Spanish

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9-9:50 | Teaching Culture in a Foreign Language Classroom: The Example of Free Speech Movement – (Room 32)
by Vesna Rodic
Abstract: This presentation includes a review of current theories on teaching culture as well as a series of practical exercises intended to build students’ cultural competence in L2.  Using the example of the Free Speech Movement, this session shows how instructors can rely on local resources and a comparative approach in order to incorporate the teaching of culture in language courses. The example serves to examine ways of including questions of social change in a language classroom as a way of building students’ trans-cultural and trans-lingual skills.
Level of Education: secondary, post-secondary
Main Language of Presentation: English ─ Examples in French

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9-9:50 |  OMG … Oh My Game! An integrative Method to bring Motivation to Foreign Language Classroom – (Room 31)
by Haitham S. Mohamed
Abstract: This paper explores the types of games that can be used and what can be considered a game. Moreover, it is necessary to know when and how to use a game. With hands-on games, focusing on vocabulary and grammar, this paper will also discuss how to design an in-class game and what is the recipe that can be used to create a pedagogically successful game.  The games suggested in this paper are an application on Arabic language in Arabic as a foreign language classroom.
Level of Education: secondary, post-secondary
Main Language of Presentation: English ─ Examples in English and Arabic

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9-9:50 | How can neuroscience inform the use of technology in language education?  – (Room 54)
by Ali Bolgün and Tatiana McCaw
Abstract: Given the speed with which technology is evolving and the large number of applications that are available, there has been a sentiment and a common intuition that technology must be helping to increase students’ language proficiency levels. This presentation reviews various technologies that have been used in the language classroom, and offers a neurolinguistic perspective on the distinction between learning and acquisition for building a mindset that leads to more beneficial use of technology.
Level of Education: All levels
Main Language of Presentation: English

 


10-10:50

 

10-10:50 | Online tools for every language teacher – (Room 212)
by Jane Dilworth and Fabian Banga
Abstract: Can we successfully reproduce the experience of the face-to-face classroom online and, if so, how and to what degree? The presenters will explore these key questions with examples from different types of language classes with diverse mixtures of heritage and non-heritage learners.
Level of Education: all levels
Main Language of Presentation: English ─ Examples in Spanish

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10-10:50 | Quandaries about “Can”: Choices for the Potential Form in Japanese – (Room 51)
by Masahiko Minami
Abstract: The potential case or “can form” is typically used in English to denote the ability to do something. In Japanese we often come across two different types: the so-called proper standard form on the one hand and the sub-standard, technically incorrect grammar, which is sometimes called ra-nuki, on the other. This presentation investigates these two types of potential forms, from the perspective of descriptive grammar rather than prescriptive grammar.
Special-Interest session (Japanese teachers)

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10-10:50 | Filling the gap between what students learn at school, and fluency  – (Room 32)
by Alexandre de Chambure
Abstract: In this presentation, I would like to expose the flaws in the way French is taught in schools (applies to Spanish as well) and show a method I have created that allows my students to quickly master French grammar, while giving them the opportunity to reach fluency through the use of technologies.
Level of Education: High School and college
Main Language of Presentation: English ─ Examples in French

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10-10:50 | Describe, Create, Evaluate: Using Images in Proficiency-Based Speaking Activities – (Room 33)
by Trina Philpot-Montaño
Abstract:  This presentation examines the use of images to create speaking opportunities in proficiency-based classrooms. It will demonstrate how photographs become the basis for descriptions, narrations, and analysis of social phenomenon. The D.C.E. model encourages abstract thinking, stimulates language production, facilitates vocabulary acquisition, and promotes cross-cultural awareness. It provides opportunities for learners to engage in meaningful dialogue on a variety of topics, to broaden their world views, and to contemplate their language use more completely.
Main Language of Presentation: English ─ Examples in Spanish.

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10-10:50 | Are We Getting All We Can out of GLOSS?  – (Room 31)
by Xiaomei Schnittgrund
Abstract: GLOSS (The Global Language Online Support System) currently offers more than 7,000 lessons in Listening and Reading in 40 languages. The lessons incorporate various types of media, but do all teachers outside of DLI know and take advantage of these lessons? What approach can teachers use this resource to its fullest potential? This presentation will offer strategies for using GLOSS effectively in order to yield optimal student learning outcomes.
Level of Education: all levels
Main Language of Presentation: English ─ Examples in Chinese/Korean


Special Presentations / Keynote Addresses

pastedgraphic-111:00-11:30 – Yo Azama

“The Teacher as an Artist. Inspire and Engage Learners in the 21st Century World Language Classroom”

Azama currently teaches Japanese at North Salinas High School and World Language Teaching Method course at California State University, Monterey Bay is a team leader of the Monterey Bay World Language Project.

He has conducted numerous presentations and seminars regionally, nationally, and internationally on various topics including; Motivational Curriculum & Syllabus Design, Classroom Management,and Effective use of Technology in World Language Classroom. In 2003, he served as a member of the Instructional Materials Advisory Panel for the California Department of Education. He has also served as a College Board Advisor for AP Japanese Language and Culture Development Committee.

He has been the recipient of numerous awards such as the 2012 ACTFL Language Teacher of the Year, Outstanding Teacher of America Award by Carlston Family Foundation, the Robert J. Ludwig Distinguished Leadership Award, and Elgin Heinz Teaching Excellence Award just to name a few. His teaching has been featured in the Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Video Library by WGBH Boston in 2003.


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11:30-12:00 – Mark Kaiser, Associate Director of the Berkeley Language Center

“Teaching Languages in Context: How foreign languages can survive in the digital age”

Mark Kaiser received his PhD from the University of Michigan in 1989. He has taught Russian at Brigham Young University and Illinois State University, where he was the director of the Russian Studies program. He came to Berkeley in 1996, where he has served as Associate Director of the Berkeley Language Center and occasional lecturer in Russian. He is the project director of the “Library of Foreign Language Film Clips”, an online database of film clips for teaching language and culture in the foreign language curriculum.

 


 12:00-1:30 – Lunch

  • AATSP will host a lunch meeting in room 212

  • Japanese organizations will host a lunch meeting in room 51


1:30-2:20

 

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Special-Interest session (AATSP-NC)

1:30-2:20 | Book presentation: Brujos, espiritistas y vanguardistas. – (Room 212)
by Fabián Banga, in conversation with Anne Fountain, American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese President and Sandra García Sanborn, FLANC President.


The title is Brujos, espiritistas y vanguardistas (Witches, spiritualists and avant-garde) and was published by Editorial Leviatán  (Argentina). The book explores the representation of esoteric traditions in the aesthetic projects of the avant-garde literary movements in Latin-American and Spain of the early twentieth century.
Main Language of Presentation: Spanish-English


 

1:30-2:20 | Gateway to Content-based Instruction – (Room 51)
by Noriko Nagata and Suda Kyoko
Abstract: Michi (The Path: Exploring Japan) affords content-based instruction (CBI) and explores the histories and cultures of the various regions of Japan in authentic Japanese language.  It aims to develop learners’ cultural knowledge as well as intermediate/advanced level Japanese proficiency, incorporating the ACTFL 5 C’s.  In this session, the first presenter describes the motivation and purpose of the textbook, its chapter components, and its unique features.  The second presenter reports the implementation and outcomes of the gateway chapter of Michi, which provides a bridge from standard 2nd year texts.
Special-Interest session (Japanese teachers)

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1:30-2:20 | Every Day’s an IPA – (Room 31)
by Norah Jones
Abstract: Integrated Performance Assessments: learn how, when, where, and why to have students work in all three communication modes every day to easily and effectively to achieve your instructional goals. IPAs are really just basic, realistic human language in use in the world. You already have the tools in your repertoire to create meaningful, articulated, integrated sequence of interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational activities.  Learn how to use them for motivating, effective student learning every day.
Level of Education: secondary, post-secondary
Main Language of Presentation: English

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1:30-2:20 | Technology and Creativity: Partners for Success – (Room 32)
by Renato Alvim and Sílvia Ramos-Sollai
Abstract: We will present some evidence-proven technological tools that are simple and inclusive: apps through which students practice linguistic and cultural contents to gain more tolerance to ambiguity by recording their own voices and comparing pronunciation, a media project and video excerpts produced by students to explore an immediate access to the Lusophone world while speaking Portuguese in the very first semester of the language and more. These tools have proven to be efficient, inclusive, and dynamic practices and, at the same time, a fun and creative language engagement to class with students using their creativity in their own productions, to elaborate authentic materials researched.
Level of Education: All levels
Main Language of Presentation: English ─ Examples in Portuguese

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1:30-2:20 | Classroom Uses for Online Language Learning Web Applications – (Room 33)
by Sarac Branka
Abstract: Online, independent, computer-based, interactive foreign language, cultural teaching and learning materials that promote learner autonomy can be used in flipped classroom in order to enhance language proficiency. The presenter will share specific examples of the flipped classroom model implementation of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Institute tools in Spanish language.
Level of Education: All levels
Main Language of Presentation: English ─ Examples in Spanish

 


2:30-3:20

 

2:30-3:20 | Key Elements of Successful CBI: A Content-based Textbook for Intermediate/Advanced Japanese – (Room 51)
by Noriko Nagata and Nobuko Takamatsu
Abstract: This session presents sample chapters of a new, content-based, proficiency-oriented Japanese textbook Michi (The Path: Exploring Japan) for Intermediate/Advanced Japanese.  The presenters address key elements of successful CBI, including abundant cultural images and detailed vocabulary information, which significantly facilitates reading comprehension. The presenters also describe various CBI activities based on the textbook, and discuss effective CBI techniques.
Special-Interest session (Japanese teachers)

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2:30-3:20 |  U.S. Latino History in the Spanish classroom – (Room 212)
by Anne Fountain, Melissa Batalla and Tim Alexander
Abstract: California Spanish teachers appreciate the long Hispanic legacy in the United States and know the iconic figures like César Chávez, Luis Valdez and Dolores Huerta. But Latino presence is more prolonged and diverse than is commonly understood. This session presents some surprising historical facts, reveals the unusual ties between José Martí and California, and illustrates the similarity of the Chicano Civil Rights movement to the fight for racial justice in the U.S. South.  Classroom handouts.
Level of Education: Secondary and post-secondary
Main Language of Presentation: Spanish and English ─ Examples in:  Spanish and English

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2:30-3:20 | Let’s Kahoot for Language Learning! – (Room 31)
by Sonia Estima  & Edgar Roca
Abstract: Kahoot is an online program that allows teachers to design interactive activities through a series of questions that can incorporate videos, images and diagrams to amplify engagement! Social learning promotes discussion with strong pedagogical impact… With Kahoot students can also take charge of their own learning by generating creative quizzes. Presenters will demonstrate how to create a Kahoot and how the program can be used in the language classroom. (Participants are encouraged to bring their smart phones or other mobile devices)
Level of Education: Secondary and post-secondary

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Canceled  2:30-3:20 |  Visualizing the Américas in the Foreign-language Classroom  – (Room 33)
by María Luisa Ruiz

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2:30-3:20 |  Issues for World Languages in the Community College Context – (Room 32)

by Isabel Anievas-Gamallo and Fabián Banga
Abstract: Community College language departments in Northern California are confronted with many of the same issues; loss of funding, changes in state education code, language lab in the community college context, class size, study abroad, prerequisite enforcement, accreditation, and many more.  We share many challenges and should not have to face them alone. Together we can share ideas, challenges, and solutions.  This session will strengthen our programs as we form new alliances, collaborations, and friendships.
Level of Education: Community College, perhaps high school or other higher education
Main Language of Presentation: English
Special-Interest sessions (Community Colleges)

Written By FLANC